Moving and Copying Files and Folders in Windows Operating Systems
Posted by Berrie Watson on 08 June 2010 04:09 PM
Moving and Copying Files and Folders

Windows 2000 and XP operating systems use a file system called NTFS. It is a very secure file system, that has a particular set of rules and concepts that allow users to manage files and folders in bulk. When copying folder or files from one folder to another folder or from one partition to another partition, permissions for this files or folders may change.

Copying Files and Folders
1. When copying a folder or file within same NTFS partition (for instance C: drive to C: drive on the local computer), the copy of the folder or file inherits the destination folder permissions.
2. When copying a folder or file between different NTFS partitions (such as between the C: drive and the P: drive), the copy of the folder or file inherits the destination folder permissions.
3. When copying folders or files to non-NTFS partitions such as File Allocation Table (FAT) which are commonly used on USB thumb drives, the files or folders will lose their all NTFS permissions.
Note: To copy folders and files within same NTFS partition or between NTFS partitions, you must have read permissions for the originating folders and for the destination folder you should have write permission.

Moving Files and Folders
When moving a file or a folder, permissions may get changed depending on the destination folder permissions.
1. When moving a file to a folder within the same NTFS partition, the folder or file will retains its original permissions.
2. When moving a folder or file between different NTFS partitions, the file or folder will inherit the destination folder permissions.
3. When moving files to folders on NTFS partitions to non NTFS partitions the folders and files will lose their all NTFS permissions, as NTFS permissions are not supported by non NTFS partitions.
Note: To move folders and files within an NTFS partitions you must have both permissions, for the destination folder you should have write permission and modify permissions for source file or folder to configure the options. You need to have modified permission for folder or file to move as Windows 2000 will remove the file or folder from the main folder after copying it to the folder destination.

Inheritance
When a folder resides within another folder, the enclosing folder is called the 'parent', and the enclosed folder is called the 'child'. Ordinarily, child folders inherit the permissions of the parent folder, so if the parent folder permissions get changed then that permission set is automatically cascaded down the subfolders to allow access. This function can be altered though, and a subfolder can have its inheritance removed. At that point the parent permissions can be copied or removed from the subfolder, and then the subfolder becomes the parent for all subsequent subfolders or 'children'. Inheritance can be forced to override subfolders default permission sets, and thus can reset the permissions of all subfolders and files.
(42 votes)
This article was helpful
This article was not helpful

Comments (0)
Post a new comment 
 
Full Name:
Email:
Comments:
CAPTCHA Verification 
 
Please enter the text you see in the image into the textbox below. This is required to prevent automated registrations and form submissions.

Help Desk Software by Kayako Resolve